Drupal Planet

Web Wash: Using Pattern Trigger (Regex) in Webform Conditional Logic in Drupal 8

11 godzin 26 minutes ago

When you need to create survey style forms in Drupal 8 Webform is the clear winner. It's powerful enough to create all sorts of forms and you can even give it to your editor so they can create their own, after a little training, of course.

One part of Webform which I like is the ability to define conditional logic. For example, you can show or hide a text field based off a value from another element. You can also make an element conditionally required. It's a very useful part of Webform, and you do all of this through a UI, no custom code.

Defining simple conditional logic, check if element value has a single value, is pretty straightforward. But when you have to deal with multiple values, this is where things get tricky.

TEN7 Blog's Drupal Posts: Episode 060: A Recap of Drupaldelphia 2019

21 godzin 57 minutes ago

In this week’s podcast TEN7’s DevOps Tess Flynn aka @socketwench is our guest, giving us her observations of the Drupaldelphia 2019 conference she recently attended, as well as a summary of her helpful session, “Return of the Clustering: Kubernetes for Drupal.”

Host: Ivan Stegic
Guest: Tess Flynn, TEN7 DevOps

In this podcast we'll discuss: 

InternetDevels: Drupal multisite: how it works and when it is the best choice

1 dzień ago

Drupal allows to find the most effective solution for every business case. Large organizations often need more than one website but a collection of related sites, which would be easy to manage. To meet this need, there is the Drupal multisite feature that has become popular among education websites, government websites, corporate websites, and so on. Let’s explore what Drupal multisite is, how it works, and when it is the best choice.

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Lullabot: A Patch-less Composer Workflow for Drupal Using Forks

1 dzień ago

One of the significant advantages of using free and open-source software is the ability to fix bugs without being dependent on external teams or organizations. As PHP and JavaScript developers, our team deals with in-development bugs and new features daily. So how do we get these changes onto sites before they’re released upstream?

OpenSense Labs: The Alternatives in Decoupled Drupal Ecosystem

1 dzień 1 godzina ago
The Alternatives in Decoupled Drupal Ecosystem Shankar Wed, 05/22/2019 - 22:48

More and more users want the content to be available via a host of different devices. Various new interfaces and devices are thronging the technology landscape and are touted to bring about sweeping changes. There are even talks of website-less future. Smart wearables, Internet of Things, conversational user interface etc. have been gaining traction and are changing the way we experience the internet. New web-enabled devices need the content that the websites do but in a different format which creates complications in the way we develop. Disseminating content can have different needs from one setup to another.


The content management system (CMS) is rife with labels such as ‘decoupled’ and ‘hybrid’ which requires to be dissected for a better understanding of their benefits. Decoupling the backend of a content management system (CMS) from the frontend can be a remarkable solution for a lot of issues that are caused when you move away from standard website-only deliveries. Decoupling the CMS streamlines the process of republishing the content across numerous channels ranging from websites to applications. Decoupled CMS is not new, but as the digital arena observes changes, it gets more and more important.

The Drupal Connect Source: Dries Buytaert’s blog

As one of the leaders in the CMS market, Drupal’s content as a service approach enables you to get out of the page-based mentality. It gives you the flexibility to separate the content management from the content display and allows you the front-end developers to build engrossing customer experiences.

Decoupled Drupal implementations are becoming ubiquitous due to its immense capability in giving a push to digital innovation

Decoupled Drupal implementations, which involves a full separation of concerns between the structure of your content and its presentation, are becoming ubiquitous due to Drupal’s immense capability in giving a push to digital innovation and being a great solution in adopting novel approaches.

Drupal Community has been working on a plenitude of API-first architectures by utilising its core REST, JSON:API and GraphQL features. But there are alternative solutions, too, available in decoupled Drupal ecosystem that can be of great significance. Let’s explore them:

RESTful Web Services and others

While RESTful Web services module helps in exposing entities and other resources as RESTful web API and is one of the most important modules when it comes to decoupled Drupal implementation, there are several others that can come handy as well.

Implementing the Apache CouchDB specification and focussing upon content staging use cases as part of the Drupal Deploy ecosystem, RELAXed Web Services module can be of immense help. The CouchDB helps in storing data within JSON documents that are exposed via a RESTful API and unlike Drupal’s core REST API, it enables not just GET, POST, DELETE but also PUT and COPY.

There’s a REST UI module that offers a user interface (UI) for the configuration of Drupal 8’s REST module. You can utilise Webform REST module that helps in retrieving and submitting webforms via REST. For protracting core’s REST Export views display in order to automatically converting any JSON string field to JSON in the output, REST Export Nested module can be useful. By offering a REST endpoint, REST menu items module can be helpful in retrieving menu items on the basis of menu name. And when you need to use REST for resetting the password, REST Password Request module can be helpful. It is worth noting that Webform REST, REST Export Nested and REST Password Request are not covered by Drupal’s security advisory policy but are really valuable.

JSON:API and others

JSON: API module is an essential tool when you are considering to format your JSON responses and is one of the most sought after options in decoupled Drupal implementations. But there is, again, plenty of options for availing more features and functionalities. 

When in need of overriding the defaults that are preconfigured upon the installation of JSON: API module, you can leverage JSON: API Extras. By offering interfaces to override default settings and registering new ones that the resultant API need to follow, JSON: API Extras can be hugely advantageous in aliasing resource names and paths, modifying field output via field enhancers, aliasing field names and so on. There is JSON API File module that enables enhanced files integration for JSON: API module. And for the websites that expose consumer-facing APIs through REST, JSON: API or something similar, Key auth module offers simple key-based authentication to every user.

For streamlined ingestion of content by other applications, Lightning API module gives you a standard API with authentication and authorisation and utilises JSON: API and OAuth2 standards through JSON API and Simple Oauth modules.

GraphQL and others

GraphQL module is great for exposing Drupal entities to your GraphQL client applications. There are some more useful modules based on GraphQL. To enable integration between GraphQL and Search API modules, there is a GraphQL Search API module. Injecting data into Twig templates by just adding a GraphQL query can be done with GraphQL Twig module. To expose Drupal content entity definitions through GraphQL via GraphQL Drupal module and develop forms or views for entities via front-end automatically, you have GraphQL Entity Definitions module.

OpenAPI and related modules

OpenAPI describes RESTful web services on the basis of the schema. There is OpenAPI module in Drupal, which is not covered by Drupal’s security advisory policies but can integrate well with both core REST and JSON: API for documentation of available entity routes in those services. And for implementing an API to display OpenAPI specifications inside a Drupal website, you get OpenAPI UI module. And ReDoc for OpenAPI UI module offers the ReDoc library, which is an Open API/ Swagger-generated API reference documentation, for displaying Open API specifications inside Drupal website. Then there is Swagger UI for OpenAPI UI module that gives you Swagger UI library in order to display OpenAPI specifications inside Drupal site. You can also utilise Schemata module that provides schemas for facilitating generated documentation and generated code.

Contentajs and related modules

The need for a Nodes.js proxy that acts as middleware between Drupal content API layer and Javascript application can be addressed with the help of Contenta.js.  For Contenta.js to function properly, Contenta JS Drupal module is needed. This module is part of the Contenta CMS Drupal distribution. The Node.js proxy is essential for decoupled Drupal because of data aggregation, server-side rendering and caching. Contenta.js constitutes multithreaded Node.js server, a Subrequests server for the facilitation of request aggregation, a Redis integration and simple approach to CORS (Cross-origin resource sharing).

There are several effective modules that are part of the Contenta CMS decoupled distribution and integrates perfectly with Contenta.js. You have Subrequest module that tells the system to execute multiple requests in a single bootstrap and then return everything. JSON-RPC module offers a lightweight protocol for remote procedure calls and serves as a canonical foundation for Drupal administrative actions that are relied upon more than just REST. To resolve path aliases, Decoupled Router module gives you an endpoint and redirects for entity relates routes.

In order to enable decoupled Drupal implementations to have variations on the basis of consumer who is making the request, you can use Consumers module. You can use Consumer Image Styles that integrates well with JSON: API for giving image styles to your images in the decoupled Drupal project. And there is Simple OAuth module for implementing OAuth 2.0 Authorisation Framework RFC.

Of relating to JavaScript frameworks

Decoupled Blocks module is great for progressive decoupling and enables front-end developers to write custom blocks in whatever javascript framework that they prefer to work on. If you want to implement using Vue.js, you can use Decoupled Blocks: Vuejs. It should be noted that both of these are not covered by Drupal’s security advisory policies.

React Comments comes as a drop-in replacement for the Drupal core comment module frontend.

Also, there is a jDrupal module, which is a JavaScript library and API for Drupal REST and can be leveraged for Drupal 8 application development.

Conclusion

With Drupal as the decoupled web content management, developers can get to use a plentitude of technologies to render the front end experience.

RESTful web services, GraphQL and JSON: API are not the only resources that you get in the decoupled Drupal ecosystem. In fact, there are plenty of other alternatives that can be of paramount importance.

Drupal development is our forte and bringing stupendous digital experience to our partners has been our prime objective. Contact us at hello@opensenselabs.com and let us know how you want us to be a part of your digital transformation goals.

blog banner blog image Decoupled Drupal Drupal module Blog Type Articles Is it a good read ? On

Wim Leers: API-First Drupal: what's new in 8.7?

1 dzień 2 godziny ago

Drupal 8.7 was released with huge API-First improvements!

The REST API only got fairly small improvements in the 7th minor release of Drupal 8, because it reached a good level of maturity in 8.6 (where we added file uploads, exposed more of Drupal’s data model and improved DX.), and because we of course were busy with JSON:API :)

Thanks to everyone who contributed!

  1. JSON:API #2843147

    Need I say more? :) After keeping you informed about progress in October, November, December and January, followed by one of the most frantic Drupal core contribution periods I’ve ever experienced, the JSON:API module was committed to Drupal 8.7 on March 21, 2019.

    Surely you’re know thinking But when should I use Drupal’s JSON:API module instead of the REST module? Well, choose REST if you have non-entity data you want to expose. In all other cases, choose JSON:API.

    In short, after having seen people use the REST module for years, we believe JSON:API makes solving the most common needs an order of magnitude simpler — sometimes two. Many things that require a lot of client-side code, a lot of requests or even server-side code you get for free when using JSON:API. That’s why we added it, of course :) See Dries’ overview if you haven’t already. It includes a great video that Gabe recorded that shows how it simplifies common needs. And of course, check out the spec!

  2. datetime & daterange fields now respect standards #2926508

    They were always intended to respect standards, but didn’t.

    For a field configured to store date + time:

    "field_datetime":[{ "value": "2017-03-01T20:02:00", }] ⬇ "field_datetime":[{ "value": "2017-03-01T20:02:00+11:00", }]

    The site’s timezone is now present! This is now a valid RFC3339 datetime string.

    For a field configured to store date only:

    "field_dateonly":[{ "value": "2017-03-01T20:02:00", }] ⬇ "field_dateonly":[{ "value": "2017-03-01", }]

    Tme information used to be present despite this being a date-only field! RFC3339 only covers combined date and time representations. For date-only representations, we need to use ISO 8601. There isn’t a particular name for this date-only format, so we have to hardcode the format. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_8601#Calendar_dates.

    Note: backward compatibility is retained: a datetime string without timezone information is still accepted. This is discouraged though, and deprecated: it will be removed for Drupal 9.

    Previous Drupal 8 minor releases have fixed similar problems. But this one, for the first time ever, implements these improvements as a @DataType-level normalizer, rather than a @FieldType-level normalizer. Perhaps that sounds too far into the weeds, but … it means it fixed this problem in both rest.module and jsonapi.module! We want the entire ecosystem to follow this example.

  3. rest.module has proven to be maintainable!

    In the previous update, I proudly declared that Drupal 8 core’s rest.module was in a “maintainable” state. I’m glad to say that has proven to be true: six months later, the number of open issues still fit on “a single page” (fewer than 50). :) So don’t worry as a rest.module user: we still triage the issue queue, it’s still maintained. But new features will primarily appear for jsonapi.module.

Want more nuance and detail? See the REST: top priorities for Drupal 8.7.x issue on drupal.org.

Are you curious what we’re working on for Drupal 8.8? Want to follow along? Click the follow button at API-First: top priorities for Drupal 8.8.x — whenever things on the list are completed (or when the list gets longer), a comment gets posted. It’s the best way to follow along closely!1

Was this helpful? Let me know in the comments!

For reference, historical data:

  1. ~50 comments per six months — so very little noise. ↩︎

Duo Consulting: Drupal vs WordPress: Which is Right for You?

1 dzień 18 godzin ago

For website builders, the perennial debate between WordPress and Drupal rages on. As a Drupal-focused agency, it would be easy for us to promote Drupal’s benefits while badmouthing WordPress. Ultimately, though, that kind of thinking distracts form a more nuanced take on the debate: which CMS is best for you? While we’ve covered the comparisons between the two platforms before, it’s always worth revisiting the similarities and differences between them.

Part of the reason why the “WordPress vs Drupal” narrative persists is because there is no definitive “winner.” Drupal and WordPress are both great tools that we’d have no problem recommending. In fact, the two platforms have more in common than you might realize. Both WordPress and Drupal are free, open source content management systems with vast ecosystems of contributed plugins and modules. Both are also sustained by communities of users and developers who continue to make each platform successful.

Ultimately, the choice between WordPress and Drupal comes down to you and your site’s requirements. Both platforms come with advantages and disadvantages depending on the task at hand, so it really is a case-by-case basis. Instead of boiling the matter down to “Drupal vs. WordPress,” consider the following comparisons against your needs to determine which platform is the best fit for your project.

Ease vs Order

Imagine that you want to publish a new piece of content on the site. If you’re just trying to, say, publish a blog on your site as quickly as you can, it’s hard to beat WordPress. With its simple-to-use interface, WordPress streamlines the content management process and makes it easier for editors to swiftly publish or edit a basic story.

On the other hand, if you have content originating from multiple sources and you want to be able to publish across channels, consider the Drupal CMS. While slightly more difficult to master, the Drupal back end can handle varying data types and keep them organized. Essentially, if you are managing multiple sites or are publishing more complex content types, Drupal’s has the power to deliver a robust, seamless experience.

Model vs. Building Blocks

Consider a model kit. If you follow the directions and don’t deviate, you’ll end up with a sleek and stylish figure. WordPress is very much the same. Sites built using WordPress are specially optimized for easy posting and content creation. If your needs are contained and fit within the boundaries of what WordPress was designed to do, it’s a perfect out-of-the-box solution.

Adding custom features to a WordPress site, however, can be complicated. This is not the case with Drupal, which is more akin to building blocks than to a model. Much like a field of Lego bricks strewn on the floor, Drupal allows for so much customization that you may not even know where to start. Once you have a plan, though, a Drupal site can be configured to your exact specifications while still leaving room for changes later.

Solo vs Team

Because of its aforementioned ease-of-use, WordPress gives plenty of power to content creators. If you stick to OOTB functionality, you can manage an entire WordPress site on your own. Even the plugins and themes that you can add to a site can be updated with a click of a button, making routine maintenance easier.

Given its enterprise-level capabilities, Drupal is better suited to a site run by a team. Different roles with custom permissions can be assigned to different team members inside a Drupal site. These hierarchies can make it easier to collaborate on a site and ensure that there’s accountability throughout the development process.

Pages vs. Architecture

Even without any technical experience, a content creator could easily design a page on a WordPress site. The OOTB editing suite allows you to build and layout rich pages with text, images and other assets that you can quickly deploy and publish.

Though Drupal has taken strides to make their page layout builder more accessible, creating pages in Drupal takes some practice. What Drupal has going for it is its structure. Drupal offers various levels of tagging and taxonomy that allow you to organize and repurpose content in endless permutations. Further, you can create custom content types in Drupal, expanding the possibilities of what kinds of content you can publish.  

What these comparisons illustrate isn’t that one platform is better than the other. Rather, they show that each tool has its own strengths and weaknesses depending on the situation. And in the end, your mileage may vary; our team has seen enterprise sites that run on WordPress and run on Drupal. It’s all about what each user wants and needs.

Duo specializes in Drupal because we like working with the CMS’s flexibility at an enterprise scale. If you think Drupal is right for you or if you still need help deciding, please feel free to reach out to us!

Acro Media: Drupal for Open Source Experience-Led Ecommerce

1 dzień 21 godzin ago

This is the first of a two part series discussing a couple of different platforms that we at Acro Media endorse for our clients. First up, I’ll talk about Drupal, a popular open-source content management system, and how it’s excellent content capabilities can be extended using an ecommerce component of your choice. For companies that require experience-led commerce architecture solutions, Drupal as an integration friendly content engine is an ideal open source choice.

A quick introduction

People who follow our blog will already know about open source technology and Drupal because we talked about them a lot. For those of you who don’t know, here’s a quick introduction.

Open Source

Wikipedia sums up open source software well.

Open-source software is a type of computer software in which source code is released under a license in which the copyright holder grants users the rights to study, change, and distribute the software to anyone and for any purpose. Open-source software may be developed in a collaborative public manner. Open-source software is a prominent example of open collaboration.

Open-source software development can bring in diverse perspectives beyond those of a single company. A 2008 report by the Standish Group stated that adoption of open-source software models have resulted in savings of about $60 billion (£48 billion) per year for consumers.

While that describes open source software as a whole, there are many advantages of open source specifically for content creation and ecommerce. No licensing fees brings the total cost of ownership down, businesses are fully in control of their data, and integrations with virtually any other system can be created. If you like, you can read more about the advantages of open source for ecommerce via this ebook.

Drupal

Drupal is a leading open source content management system that is known for being extremely customizable and ideal for creating rich content experiences. In a CMS world dominated by WordPress, Drupal is often overlooked because of its complexity and somewhat steep learning curve. Don’t let that stop you from considering it, however, as this complexity is actually one of Drupal’s greatest strengths and the learning curve is continuously improving through admin-focused UX initiatives.

The platform can literally be made to do anything and it shines when very specialized or unique functionality is required. It has a rich ecosystem of extensions and is very developer friendly, boasting a massive development community ensuring that businesses using Drupal always have support.

On top of this, Drupal has various strategic initiatives that will keep it modern and relevant now and into the future. One of the initiatives is for the platform to be fully API-first, meaning that a primary focus of Drupal is to be integration friendly. Developers can integrate Drupal with any other software that has an API available.

Drupal for experience-led commerce

Drupal is suited for any of the three main architectures (discover your ideal architecture here), but experience-led commerce is where it’s most capable. Experience-led is for businesses who keep the customer experience top of mind. These businesses want more than to just sell products, they want to also tell their story and foster a community around their brand and their customers. They want their customer experiences to be personalized and content rich. It’s these experiences that set them apart from their competitors, and they want the freedom to innovate in whatever way is best for their business.

More often than not, SaaS ecommerce platforms alone just don’t cut it here. This is simply because they’re built for ecommerce, not as an engine for other content. Although there are a lot of benefits to SaaS for ecommerce, businesses using SaaS must conform to the limitations set by the platform and its extensions. Robust content is just not typically possible. Sure, a business may be able to maintain a blog through their SaaS ecommerce platform, but that’s about it.

Drupal, on the other hand, is a content engine first. It was built for content, whatever that content may be. If you can dream it, Drupal can do. On top of this, Drupal, being integration friendly through its API-first initiative, allows businesses the freedom to integrate any compatible SaaS or open source ecommerce platform. At this point, a complete content & commerce solution has been created and the only limitation is your imagination and available resources to implement it. Implementation can be done in-house with an internal IT team or outsourced to one of the many service providers within the Drupal marketplace, Acro Media being one of them.

Let’s look at three widely different examples of Drupal based experience-led commerce.

TELUS Mobility

Website: www.telus.com

TELUS Mobility is one of Canada’s largest telecommunications companies. Imagine the missed opportunities when a customer’s online billing isn’t connected to your latest promotions and customer service can’t quickly or easily get this information in front of them. This was a problem that they faced and business restrictions, one being that they need to own all of their code and data, required that they look outside of the SaaS marketplace for a solution. Drupal, combined with a Drupal-native Drupal Commerce extension, was the solution that they needed. The open source code base of both Drupal and the Commerce extension meant that TELUS Mobility had the control and ownership that they needed. The result was huge, many important customers and customer service UX improvements were made which enabled TELUS Mobility to outperform their competitors.

You can read the full TELUS Mobility case study here.

Bug Out Bag Builder

Website: www.bugoutbagbuilder.com

Bug Out Bag Builder (BOBB) is a content-rich resource centered around preparedness. They generate a lot of different types of content and needed a way to do it that is easy and reusable. They also had a very unique commerce element that needed to tie in seamlessly. Here’s how we did it.

First is the content aspect. BOBB is full of content! They maintain an active blog, continuously write lengthy product reviews and provide their readers with various guides and tutorials. They’re a one-stop-shop for anything preparedness and have a ton of information to share. As you can see, a simple blog wouldn’t be sufficient enough for this business. They needed a way to create various types of content that can be shared and reused in multiple places. The Drupal CMS was easily able to accommodate. All of the content has a specific home within the site, but each article is categorized and searchable. Content can be featured on the homepage with the click of a button. Various blocks throughout the site show visitors the most recent content. Reviews can be attached to products within their online custom bug out bag builder application (more on this below). All of this is great, but what makes Drupal a fantastic content engine is that if BOBB ever needs to use this content in another way, all of the saved data can be reused and repurposed without needing to recreate the content. Just a little configuration and theming work would need to be done.

Second is the commerce aspect. BOBB is not a standard ecommerce store. At their core, they’re actually an Amazon Associate. They’ve developed a trust with their readers by providing fair and honest reviews of preparedness products that are listed on the Amazon marketplace. If a reader then goes and buys the product, BOBB gets a cut since they helped make the sale.

That’s all pretty normal, but what makes BOBB unique is that they also have a web-based Custom Bag Builder application. This tool has a number of pre-built “BOBB recommended” bag configurations for certain situations. Customers can select these bags (or start from scratch), view/add/remove any of the products, and finally complete the purchase. Since BOBB doesn’t need the full capabilities of ecommerce, it didn’t make sense for them to be paying monthly licensing fees. Drupal Commerce was selected for this purpose. It’s used as a catalog for holding the product information and creating a cart. Then, an integration between Drupal Commerce and Amazon transfers the cart information to Amazon where the customer ultimately goes through checkout. Amazon then handles all of the fulfillment and BOBB gets the commission.

BikeHike Adventures

Website: www.bikehike.com

BikeHike Adventures was founded as a way of bringing like-minded adventurers together through the unique style of world travel that they promote – activity, culture and experience. They provide curated travel packages that customers enquire about through the BikeHike Adventure website. Travel is all about experience and they needed to share this experience through their website. They also needed more than just a standard article page to do it since there is a ton of information to share about each package. Furthermore, they wanted to give customers a way to reserve a trip for pre-selected dates or through a custom trip planner. Again, Drupal was a perfect fit.

When you visit the site, you’re immediately thrown into the world of active travel through a rich video banner followed by a series of travel packages, a travel blog and more. There is a lot of exciting locations and vibrant imagery throughout.

Clicking into a package, you’re again hit with spectacular photography and all of the information you would need to make a decision. You can read about the trip, view the itinerary and locations marked on a map, learn about what’s included and where you’ll be staying, read interesting and useful facts about the country and location, see a breakdown of day-to-day activities, read previous traveler review, and more. When a customer is ready to book, they can submit an enquiry which is then handed off to the BikeHike Adventures travel agents.

A commerce component isn’t actually being used in this site, but it’s just a great example of content and customer experience that is used to facilitate a booking with a travel agent. If BikeHike Adventures wanted to in the future, they are free to integrate the booking and payment platforms of their choice to automate some, if not all, of that aspect of this process. By utilizing the open source Drupal CMS, this is an option that they can exercise at any point in time.

Who is Drupal best suited for?

Drupal could be used for any business, but it’s typically best suited for ecommerce businesses:

  • Who want to differentiate their brand through personalized shopping experiences
  • Who want to showcase products outside of a standard product page
  • Who want the power to develop a content-rich experience AND have an industry standard checkout process
  • Who want to sell across multiple channels and third-party marketplaces
  • Who need to develop and execute cohesive and synchronized marketing campaigns across multiple channels
  • Who want the freedom to integrate and connect their CMS and commerce platform with other components within their overall architecture
  • Who want to limit platform fees and instead invest in their own commerce infrastructure

In closing, there’s a reason why the ecommerce market is open to open source more than ever. Businesses are increasingly seeing that open source provides a quality foundation for which to build and integrate the solutions they need for today's new-age ecommerce. Customer experience is now seen as a competitive advantage and there are a handful of options that can provide this experience, Drupal being one of them. If you’re looking experience-led ecommerce solutions, consider Drupal. It might just be what you need.

Additional resources

If you liked this article, check out these related resources.

myDropWizard.com: Drupal 6 supports MySQL 8 (starting in Drupal 6.51)

1 dzień 23 godziny ago

As you probably know, Drupal 6 reached its End-of-Life (EOL) on February 24th, 2016. However, the mantle of supporting Drupal 6 was taken up by the Drupal 6 Long-Term Support vendors - including the team here at myDropWizard!

Long-Term Support isn't glamorous or exciting.

It's making security releases. It's minor bug fixes. Sometimes it's updating a contrib module that hasn't had an official release since 2009 to work with PHP 7. :-)

In fact, a big part of Drupal 6 Long-Term Support (D6LTS) is updating Drupal 6 core and contrib to work with new technologies, especially as the older versions that it was originally designed to work with become deprecated or reach their own EOL, like when PHP 5 reached its EOL at the end of last year. (Did you know that Drupal 6 now works with PHP 7?)

Today, I'd like to announce that Drupal 6 supports MySQL 8, starting with Drupal 6.51!

This was implemented in collaboration with the community, largely the contributions of f1mishutka, but also a number of others who contributed testing and bug reports.

I know there's a lot of anxiety over how Drupal 7 Extended Support (D7ES) is going to work, however, I think that this is more evidence that the vendor-supported model used by D6LTS (and soon, D7ES) is working.

You can download the latest Drupal 6 LTS core release from GitHub.